What would be a barometer of public safety in Japan?

 

As I wrote in the last newsletter, the Japanese are very proud of the fact that there are many vending machines operating safely in Japan.

However, there are actually a lot of vending machine burglars in Japan.

Especially, a photo booth, a cubicle room in which a person closes the curtain, and sits to have photograph taken by a machine, is easily targeted by thieves.

Also, on Halloween day at Shibuya this year, there were some people going on a rampage, and arrested on suspicion of molestation, taking photos secretly, or rolling over a car.

 

Therefore, I would like to talk about a barometer of public safety in Japan.

One of my friends says that “If you look at the toilet of convenience store, you will know the public safety of the area.” Depends on a sign hanging on the toilet door, you will see how safe the neighborhood is, he insists.

If a sigh says;

  • “Please feel free to use” = Safe neighborhood
  • “Please notify our staffbefore using” = Normal
  • “Do not use” = Rough area

According to another friends of mine, “Trash box of convenience stores can also be a barometer of security.”

He says that “the neighborhood where the trash box put outside can be an evidence that there are many customers who keep the rules. Therefore, security of the area is good.”

From my perspective, the neighborhood with many flower and cake shops are relatively safe, because flowers and cakes are bought more likely for gifts to others.

I logically believe that there are many people who can do something for other people in areas with many flower shops and cake shops.

What is a barometer of public safety in your area?

If you have any other opinion, please let me know.

 

 

*Please note that this is just a personal opinion. It would vary in urban or rural areas, commercial area or residential area. So, please read this article just for reference.

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