Funny non-Japanese celebrities living and working in Japan


I’d like to introduce you to funny non-Japanese celebrities living and working in Japan.

【Atsugiri Jason】

Jason became famous for his phrase “Why Japanese People!” to lament the difficulty of the Japanese language.

He wanted to be a comedian in Japan, but they don’t give out visas for that, so he came to Japan and joined an IT company that was expanding in Japan. Later, he attended an entertainer training school, and has continued both jobs until the present time.



This comedian works as a team with a Japanese comedian. He not only appears on comedy shows, he also does other work as the moderator of an English education program and a commentator. He is actually a prodigy and graduate of Harvard.



【Chad Mullane】

Chad dreamed of becoming a comedian. When he came to Japan to study abroad he felt Japanese comedy is the best in the world. After graduating from high school, he entered entertainer training school. Now, in addition to working as a comedian, he also works as a translator, translating many Japanese comedy movies.


I have three reasons for telling you about these people.

First, they are all are very good at Japanese.

Second, just like Jason Atsugiri, you can come to Japan and work at a job for which a visa is relatively easy to get, and then find work in the kind of job you really want.

Third, Pak-kun and Chad get many offers to do work other than being comedians. In other words, it’s important to have a career plan once you arrive in Japan.


Social Studies Field Trips in Japan that Anyone Can Enjoy


During my grade school days in Japan, there was an extracurricular activity, called a “social studies field trip”, where I got to visit a local factory.

In recent years, more and more companies are actively accepting factory tours in order to create corporate fans, and field trips for adults are very popular. Such tours can easily be enjoyed, because they usually are free or cost only a few hundred yen.


I have primarily selected spots close to Tokyo.

Note that in some cases you must apply in advance, or there may be age restrictions or limits on the number of people in a group. Check with each site for details. Most websites are in Japanese only, but try to do the best you can.



Beer tastes significantly different depending on the country. Japanese beer is relatively easy to get used to for people from overseas.

Almost all beer factories allow beer tasting, so I recommend these tours for beer lovers.


KIRIN(Yokohama City, Kanagawa Prefecture) 


ASAHI(Minamiashigara City, Kanagawa Prefecture)


SUNTORY(Fuchuu City, Tokyo)


SAPPORO(Funabashi City, Chiba Prefecture)


Japanese Sake

For Japanese sake, there is a huge warehouse called a sakagura (酒蔵) that you can tour.


SAWANOI (Oume City, Tokyo)


KOYAMASHUZO  (Kita Ward, Tokyo)


ISHIKAWASHUZO(Fussa City, Tokyo)



Soy Souce

You can also see how soy sauce, an integral part of Japanese cuisine, is made.


Yugeta Soy Sauce (Hidaka City, Saitama Prefecture)


Kikkoman Soy Sauce (Noda City, Chiba Prefecture) site)



Automobiles and Motorcycles

You can see the history of Japanese cars and motorcycles, and famous cars from the past. These tours should be irresistible to car and motorcycle enthusiasts.


TOYOTA(Toyota City, Aichi Prefecture)


NISSAN (Several plant tours exist)


HONDA (Several plant tours exist)


MAZDA (Hiroshima City, Hiroshima Prefecture)


SUBARU (Oota City, Gunma Prefecture)


SUZUKI(Hamamatsu City, Shizuoka Prefecture)


KAWASAKI (Kobe City, Hyogo Prefecture) tours)(English site) City, Hyogo Prefecture)

(Kawasaki limits tours to motorcycle clubs only)


YAMAHA(Iwata City, Shizuoka Prefecture)



The airplane hangars are incredibly impressive.


JAL (Oota Ward, Tokyo)


ANA (Oota Ward, Tokyo)




You can even buy gifts and souvenirs. There’s even a place that offers all-you-can-eat ice cream for free!


glico (Kitamoto City, Saitama Prefecture)



(Hokkaido, Tochigi Prefecture, Hiroshima Prefecture)


AKAGI (Honjoo City, Saitama Prefecture)

*This is the manufacturer of the popular Garigari Kun ice cream in Japan.


chateraise (Hokuto City, Yamanashi Prefecture)


unagipai(Hamamatsu City, Shizuoka Prefecture)


shiroikoibito(Sapporo City, Hokkaido)

(English site)


royce (Chitose City, Hokkaido) site)





(Yokohama City, Kanagawa Prefecture) site)

You can make your own original cup ramen, including drawing a picture on the container and choosing the ingredients.


Yamato (Oota Ward, Tokyo)

You can tour the latest facilities of a Japanese distribution company that delivers luggage quickly and accurately.


Railway-Museum (Saitama City, Saitama Prefecture) site)

This is a museum, so it is a little bit different from a social studies field trip, but it is a very popular spot for those who like trains.


Double-jobber increasing in Japan!


In Japan, the way of thinking about side jobs is changing.

It became a hot topic that Softbank, Japan ‘s major telecom giant, allowed their workers to do side jobs since November 2017.



■ Why did this movement happen?

There are five main reasons.

  • As a Japanese employment system, seniority and lifetime employment are famous, but this system is changing.
  • Anxiety about pension.
  • Pursuit of diverse lifestyle
  • With the spread of nets and tools, it became easier to have side jobs.

・Because it is a shortage of talented people, it also has the aim of recruiting and holding excellent talent by allowing various ways of working.


■ Main side jobs being done in Japan

  • Asset management (eg real estate management)
  • Utilization of idle assets (eg Airbnb, Anyca) in the sharing economy * UBER is not operating in Japan.
  • Second-hand goods sale (example: Amazon Marketplace, Ebay, Mercari, Yahoo auction)
  • Internet Talent business, Internet Advertisement business (eg YouTuber, blogger)
  • Utilize skills and qualifications (eg translation, interpreting, weekend soccer referee, rafting guide)


■ Side jobs unique to Non-Japanese people

There are an increasing number of Japanese people who start business for overseas / foreigners around me. So, in addition to translation, interpreting, demand for overseas market research etc seems to grow further. Language teachers will be needed more.



Your knowledge and skills are required more and more, but we strongly recommend that you check your employment rules and laws.

There are still many companies banning side jobs under the employment regulations. Please pay attention to VISA, too. If you earn income for operations other than what is stipulated in VISA, it will be regarded as “unauthorized activity” and become illegal here in Japan.


There is no doubt that opportunities are increasing, so follow the rules and get your success.



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